Hokkaido Ski Touring: Mt. Okuteine, Yama-no-ie Hut and Mt. Tsuge (Sapporo, Japan)


Here, I outline a looping ski tour that makes the most of the topography surrounding the amazing Yama-no-Ie Hut tucked below Mt. Okuteine (奥手稲山, 948m) on the outer reaches of Sapporo City (shorter route to the hut here). The hut is everything you can expect from a mountain hut managed by largely ambivalent Japanese university students: dingy, messy, and a glowing red-hot potbelly stove kept that way by the intrepid first-year students who hauled the coal up the mountain on their backs. But it’s that charm that makes the 4 hour ski tour to the hut, via Mt. Okuteine and back via Mt. Tsuge (つげ山, 935m), more than worth while.

Route GPS File

Early morning backcountry skiing near Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

Essential details


13km
Distance


2 days
Time


660m
Ascent


948m
Highest point


5/10
Difficulty?


Jan-Apr
Best Season?

Need-to-Know Details

  • Location: The start of this route (location) is about 2.5km downhill from Sapporo Kokusai Ski Area, in the hills west of Sapporo city.
  • General notes: The main feature of this route is the Okuteine Yama-no-Ie Hut (奥手稲山の家), but the route to get to the hut goes via Mt. Okuteine, and the route to get back to the parking area on the way back goes via Mt. Tsuge. In good clear weather conditions, this route will allow for a full experience of the topography around this area. If the weather is less agreeable, and/or you’d rather a more straightforward, quick route to the hut, consider the valley route instead (3 hours to the hut, route here).
  • Route markers: There are very sporadic, non-official route markers. Please assume you’ll see no route markers.
  • Transport
    • Public transport: As of March 2017, there were around 6 buses in the morning going from Sapporo Station Bus Terminal No. 17 to Sapporo Kokusai Ski Field (see details in English here). The earliest bus was at 7:10am, arriving at the ski field at 8:50am. The start of the route is about 2.5km downhill from the ski area; just skin among the forest next to the main road (route here).
    • By car: There is a large carpark area at the start of the trail (location).
  • Paper topographical maps: For topographical maps, you can either print out what you want from the Geospacial Information Authority of Japan here (the hut is in the cross-hairs – see printing instructions here), or buy the following 1/25000 paper topo map (for 350yen) from a bookstore in Sapporo (such as Kinokuniya next to Sapporo Station).
  • Snow and route safety: This is a relatively safe route in fair conditions. When visibility is poor, stick to the valley floor route (3 hours to the hut, route here).
  • Weather forecast (Google Translated): Weather for Mt. Teine (in the immediate vicinity)
  • Other resources
    • The more direct route to the hut goes via the Okuteine-yama River valley – route guide here.
    • Parts of this route are part of the 3-day Sapporo Kokusai Ski area to the sea ski-traverse (route information here).
    • See the write-up (in Japanese) in the Yuki-yama Guide (ISBN: 978-4894538047) on pages 94-97 for the route to the hut via Mt. Okuteine, and pages 118-121 for the Mt. Tsuge route back.
  • Onsen neaby: Jozankei Onsen area has a huge number of onsen to choose from. If traveling by car, consider either Hoheikyo Onsen (1,000yen per person, and they have Indian curry), Hotel Milione (500yen per person), or Matsu-no-yu closer to Sapporo City (about 650yen per person).
  • Date visited: 17th and 18th January, 2016

See my Hokkaido Ski Touring Resources page for more trips and tips

Please read my disclaimer, if you haven’t already

Okuteine Yama-no-Ie Hut (奥手稲山の家) Essential Information

Yama-no-Ie Hut near Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

Yama-no-Ie Hut near Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

Yama-no-Ie Hut near Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

  • Location of Okuteine Yama-no-Ie Hut: Tucked into the hills to the west of Mt. Teine, and east of Sapporo Kokusai Ski Area (here).
  • Details: The Okuteine Yama-no-Ie (literally “mountain house”) hut was built in 1930 during the early skiing boom era in Japan by the National Railway Department to facilitate ski touring in and around the Zenibako area. It was built in cooperation with professors at Hokkaido University. The idea was that if the railway department built a dedicated ski touring hut in the hills near Zenibako Station, then that would boost the department’s profits, since skiers would flock to the area by train (see more detailed history on the 3-day traverse route here). The hut is now owned by Hokkaido University, and managed by the Hokkaido University Wandervogel Student Club.
  • Booking: In principle, overnight stays must be pre-booked and paid up at Hokkaido University. Either call 011-706-7456 directly to book, or if your Japanese is rusty, then head straight to the No. 3 window on the ground floor at the Institute for the Advancement of Higher Education at Hokkaido University to book and pay (location on Google maps).
  • Fee: 80yen per person per night (yes, 80yen – that’s not a typo).
  • Facilities
    • Heating: Coal stove. The hut is heated with a roaring coal stove, with copious amounts of coal available for use. Newspaper for starting the fire is also supplied. Use copious amounts of newspaper, rolled tightly, to light the coal (i.e., fill the stove 2/3 with paper, and put some coal on top). Make sure the stove has been thoroughly cleared of ash inside before lighting. The coal stove can bring a large kettle of water to boil in about 20 minutes.
    • Water: The hut has running water in the kitchen, flowing 24/7 in winter to avoid freezing the pipes. The water source is a creek near the hut, so please boil before consuming.
    • Kitchen/cooking: There is a separated kitchen area with a full array of utensils, pots and pans. There are no cooking facilities apart from the coal stove, so you’ll need your own gas/portable cooker if you want to heat things quickly.
    • Bedding: The hut has a limited number of old mattresses and blankets, but you may want to bring your own sleeping bag and mat. In particular on the weekends it is first in first served on the bedding.
    • Electricity: There are solar panels and an inverter which power a couple of LED lights inside the hut, however sunny days can be few and far between, so the batteries may not be charged very full. Better to assume no electricity in the hut.
    • Toilets: There are basic long-drops in the hut, accessed from the entrance area.
  • Hutkeeper: On the weekends, Hokkaido University Wandervogel club members, from the club that manages the hut, are often at the hut from late morning on Saturday to early morning on Sunday. On weekdays there is no manager at the hut but it is unlocked and can be used.
  • Special Yama-no-Ie Hut usage notes: Boots can be worn inside the hut on the ground floor in winter, but the upper two floors are socks only. Please make sure to clean/sweep up after use, and clear the stove of any ash before you leave.  Like most huts in Hokkaido, Okuteine Hut is maintained 100% through passionate, volunteer time and effort. Always leave a hut cleaner than you found it.

Trip Report

It was only a couple of weeks ago that I was up at the Ginreiso Hut at the foot of Mt. Haruka (blog post here), but even then I was eyeing up another backcountry hut, the Yama-no-ie Hut directly due south of the summit of Mt. Okuteine (full route map and GPS file at the end of this blog post). Mt. Okuteine is just along a ridge from Mt. Haruka, and also offers some fairly straight forward navigation up to some expansive views over Ishikari Bay. And all of this still within the Sapporo City limits.

Joining on this trip was Dirk, as well three Europeans I’d never met before until a couple of days before the trip: Mathieu and his brother Vincent, both French, and their longtime Greek-but-living-in-France friend Angelo. Mathieu had gotten a hold of me via Warmshowers.org, since he had, up to coming up to Hokkaido, been on a two-year long cycle journey around the world. The plan was to take three weeks out of the cycling journey, hire a car with the other two, and do some ski touring in Hokkaido. The timing of their arrival perfectly coincided with the Mt. Okuteine trip that Dirk and I were planning. So for me, this weekend long trip ended up being an opportunity not only to show some visitors some quintessential Sapporo winter hills, but also help orient some travelers on the finer points of traveling in Japan.

This naturally began with taking Mathieu and co. to the local supermarket (Chitose Aeon Supermarket – location) to buy supplies for their three week trip…

Preparing skis and buying supplies for a Hokkaido backcountry ski trip (Chitose City, Japan)

And the three of them commandeering our spare room to stay the night before the trip and prepare their ski gear.

Preparing skis and buying supplies for a Hokkaido backcountry ski trip (Chitose City, Japan)

Preparing skis and buying supplies for a Hokkaido backcountry ski trip (Chitose City, Japan)

Preparing skis and buying supplies for a Hokkaido backcountry ski trip (Chitose City, Japan)

Preparing skis and buying supplies for a Hokkaido backcountry ski trip (Chitose City, Japan)

The next morning was an early start for us all from Chitose City. We had arranged to meet Dirk in Sapporo at 7:30am on the way to Lake Sapporo, where we would park the car and start the ski up Mt. Okuteine and to the hut. This meant leaving Chitose bright and early at 6:30am. All the preparations of the previous days paid off, however, and we made it to Sapporo only half an hour late, and were at the trailhead by just after 9:30am.

TOP TIP: The parking area is here (https://goo.gl/maps/qqbcqYrmGe32)

Climbing up to Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

By the time we left the car park, a light snow had started to fall, which would continue while we trudged along the flat forestry road…

Climbing up to Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

And up onto the main wide ridge up to the peak of Mt. Okuteine.

Climbing up to Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

Climbing up to Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

Once we were at the top, however, the skies cleared and allowed a huge view over Ishikari Bay and the northern parts of Sapporo City.

Climbing up to Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

We didn’t stick around at the top for too long, however. Just enough time to gobble down a very quick lunch, before setting off due south for the Yama-no-ie Hut.

Climbing up to Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

For the first time on a backcountry trip, I had downloaded a GPS tracklog from Yamareco.com, which more or less mirrored the route marked in the Hokkaido Yukiyama Guide (ISBN978-4-89453-804-7). Using this made navigation very straight forward, but I had a paper map in my pack just in case the electronics failed. Angelo was the chief navigator for the summit-to-hut route.

Climbing up to Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

We arrived at the hut just before 2pm, which made it just over three hours from trailhead to summit to hut.

Yama-no-Ie Hut near Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

The Yama-no-ie Hut (literally ‘mountain house hut’) is officially managed by the Hokkaido University Wandervogel Club. Staff and students of Hokkaido University can use the hut for free, whereas the general public pay 80 yen a night (around $0.80 a night). Registration and payment to use the hut must be done in advance at the university. Call Hokkaido University on 011-706-7456 to book. Details on all the Hokkaido University wilderness huts are here: https://www.oia.hokudai.ac.jp/about/facilities/event-and-seminar-spaces/lodges-and-huts-2/. That said, Wandervogel club members are at the hut on Saturdays and Sundays from December till April, and on weekdays and outside of the winter period, the hut is unmanned but unlocked and free for use.

The hut is heated with a gloriously inefficient potbelly stove, fueled by coal. By inefficient, I do not mean that it does not heat the hut. If kept fueled, the stove will heat all three stories of the hut, with it’s long flue which runs the entire height of the hut in the middle of the open mezzanine floors. By inefficient I mean that there is next to no possible way to restrict air to the stove, which means that the stove is always running at full bore. Because we arrived at the hut before the club members, we decided to get the fire going to warm the place up. I managed to get the stove going using a mass of newspapers and half a bucket of coal (all supplied: every last piece of coal is lugged up the mountain by Wandervogel club members in the summer months and stored away for use during winter), but we soon found that if a whole bucket of coal is put into the fire, then that bucket of coal will be reduced to ashes in less than an hour. The three-story high flue draws a draft like nothing else.

After getting the stove running, four of us headed up the hill from the hut for a few runs of powdery skiing. And powdery it was. The hike up took about 20 minutes, and the ride down was over in less than two minutes, but it was all worth it.

Backcountry skiing near Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

When we arrived back at the hut, another 16 or so people had turned up. 6 in one group, 10 in another. This made for a rather chaotic evening of maneuvering around each other and tables and pots and dirty plates and hanging clothes and skins. On our menu was a Japanese hotpot nabe. The original plan was to have chicken and pork in the hotpot, but we realised at the trailhead that the box containing the meat, bread, and eggs for breakfast the next day had been left at our apartment. We had plenty of tofu and udon noodles though, so we made do.

Yama-no-Ie Hut near Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

Sharing our table was a group of Wandervogel OBs. “I graduated from Hokkaido University in 1974,” boasted one of them, already clearly under the influence of a mix of beer, Japanese sake, and whiskey. He, and most of the other Hokkaido University Wandervogel alumni were well into their 60’s but still made the pilgrimage to the hut on a regular basis.

Yama-no-Ie Hut near Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

Yama-no-Ie Hut near Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

Before heading to bed, Dirk floated the idea of getting up early the next day and skinning up to the ridge above the hut to see the sunrise. So we all headed to bed fairly early. And were summarily woken by Wandervogel OBs talking loudly into the wee hours of the morning…

Yama-no-Ie Hut near Mt. Okuteine (Hokkaido, Japan)

It was definitely worth getting up early for the sunrise, however. I initially found myself half asleep as we trudged up yesterday’s traces, now covered in a few centimeters of new snow. However, I think it was Dirk’s shriek of delight that brought my attention to the vibrant pink that they rising sun was painting the snowy landscape with. It was like nothing I’ve ever seen.

Early morning backcountry skiing near Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

Early morning backcountry skiing near Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

Early morning backcountry skiing near Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

Early morning backcountry skiing near Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

We were all over the moon.

Early morning backcountry skiing near Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

We celebrated by skiing back down to the hut on the famed “Utopia Piste” (yutopia gerende). This is a 400m or so long cleared path with a nice gradient, perfect for a few turns in delicious powder.

Early morning backcountry skiing near Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

After a breakfast of left over hotpot, heated on the roaring coal-powered potbelly stove, we headed out on a route for Mt. Tsuge, suggested first by Mathieu. This peak was more or less at the same altitude as the hut, and the maps suggested that we’d be able to get there with some traversing around the contours of the land. Furthermore, it was in the direction of the carpark, so it was well and truly on the way back down. As it happened, it turned out that the group of OBs were also planning to head up to Mt. Tsuge, so we’d likely see them at the top.

What was clear from the start of our second day, was that it was going to be amazing weather. After having a few recent ski trips with either grey weather or snow, it was very refreshing to have contrast again.

Climbing Mt. Tsuge from Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

It wasn’t all super easy going, however, and the contours of the land kept us on our toes as Mathieu steered us around bluffs and gullies.

Editor’s note: The route we took was a contour-line-hugging route around from the same elevation as the hut. The route outlined in the GPX file attached to this route guide is a much safer, much less strenuous traverse across the ridge from the top of the Yutopia Piste to Mt. Tsuge.

Climbing Mt. Tsuge from Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

Before long we found ourselves on the main ridge leading to Mt. Tsuge, and taken aback by the amazing view towards Mt. Muine above Jozankei and clear crisp blue skies. I really can’t get enough of those craggy trees and their bulbous accumulations of snow.

At the top we posed with the members of the old guard, before hurtling back down towards the direction of the car park.

Climbing Mt. Tsuge from Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

Climbing Mt. Tsuge from Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

Climbing Mt. Tsuge from Yama-no-ie Hut (Mt. Okuteine, Hokkaido, Japan)

The idea had been to try to get as far back to the car as possible without having to push too much along the flat forestry road, but in the end we did find ourselves pushing for 20 minutes or so from where we dropped out of the gradient onto the valley floor.

So many thanks to Mathieu, Vincent and Angelo for making it such a memorable trip!


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2 thoughts on “Hokkaido Ski Touring: Mt. Okuteine, Yama-no-ie Hut and Mt. Tsuge (Sapporo, Japan)

  • Rob

    Hey,
    Thanks very much for publishing your blog posts. Up to discovering your page we have found very little backcountry resources in the area, so this is super helpful!
    Regarding the Yama -no-ie hut, does it have cooking stoves available for use other than the potbelly?
    Thanks again,
    R

    • Rob Thomson Post author

      Hey Rob, thanks for the encouragement!

      As for your question, I’ve updated the hut info: “There are no cooking facilities apart from the coal stove, so you’ll need your own gas/portable cooker if you want to heat things quickly.”

      Thank you for requesting clarification – it is inquiries like this that refine these route guides, so much appreciated!